This is part 4 of my series on configuring a mail server, please see part one, part two and part three if you’re not familiar with them.

The content of this article was written to work with the previous three articles but should work on any SpamAssassin set-up.

Razor

First off we need to install Razor.

sudo apt-get install razor

Now we need to run three commands to register and configure Razor.

sudo razor-admin -home=/etc/spamassassin/.razor -register
sudo razor-admin -home=/etc/spamassassin/.razor -create
sudo razor-admin -home=/etc/spamassassin/.razor -discover

These 3 commands should be pretty self explanatory, they register Razor, create it’s configuration and discover the Razor servers.

Pyzor

Now we’ll install Pyzor.

sudo apt-get install pyzor

Now we also need to tell Pyzor to discover it’s servers.

pyzor --homedir /etc/mail/spamassassin discover

SpamAssassin

Add the following lines to the end …

This is part 2 of my series on mail servers on Debian 6/Ubuntu 10.04, it should work on other versions of each though. Part 1 is available here.

SpamAssassin

First off we’ll get SpamAssassin installed and configured.

sudo apt-get install spamassassin

We’ll be configuring SpamAssassin as a daemon that Postfix interfaces with using spamc.

SpamAssassin on Debian and Ubuntu runs as root which is NOT a good thing so we’ll need to make some changes.

We’ll add a group called spamd with GID**5001**.

sudo groupadd -g 5001 spamd

Next we add a user spamd with UID 5001 and add it to the spamd group, as well as set it’s home directory as /var/lib/spamassassin and make sure it has no shell access or SSH access.

sudo useradd -u 5001 -g spamd -s /usr/sbin/nologin -d /var/lib/spamassassin spamd

Now …